Maps of Georgia

describes the types of maps available as well as historical county boundaries changes, old vintage maps, as well as road / highway maps for all 159 counties in the State of Georgia.

Maps of Georgia

Our collection of old historical Georgia maps span over 200 years of growth. Most historical maps of Georgia were published in atlases. The State of Georgia was created as the 4th state on Jan. 2, 1788.

States bordering Georgia  are are Florida, Alabama, Tennessee, North Carolina and South Carolina

Several types of maps are useful for genealogists.
The Georgia Archives is also home to a large collection of detailed count and state maps. The collection contains over 30,000 documents. The Map Room, Georgia Department of Transportation offers modern city and county maps for a small fee.

First appearance of Georgia in 1732

First appearance of Georgia in 1732

The Province of Georgia was founded in 1732. France, England, and Spain all ruled over it at various times since 1526.

In 1498, Italian explorer John Cabot explored the coast of Georgia. In 1526 Lucas Vazques de Ayllon established  the first colony.

In 1540, Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto, led the first European expedition into the area that is now Georgia. Almost all of Georgia was controlled by the Creeks during this time.

In 1565 responding to a French attempt to settle on the southeastern coast, the Spanish began occupying of Florida.

In 1629 King Charles I of English, granted a charter for the territory to Sir Robert Heath.

Map of Georgia Indian Cessions

Map of Georgia Indian Cessions

Then on July 30 1730, James Oglethorpe and his associates petition King George II for a royal charter to establish a colony southwest of Carolina.

The first Creek Native Indian cession occurred in 1733.

1756 – 1763 – Land is won by Great Britain as a result of the Seven Years War (French and Indian War). France cedes England all French territory east of the Mississippi River, except New Orleans. The Spanish give up east and west Florida to the English in return for Cuba.

On April 7, 1798, Mississippi Territory was created from Georgia.

In 1838 Cherokee and Creek Indians are forced from the state on the Trail of Tears, as a result of the Second Creek War (Seminole War 1836 – 1837).

One of the best ways to trace colonial ancestors is to use early Georgia maps. Some give historical background of the area or show migration routes such as roads, rivers, and railroads. Maps showing militia districts and land lottery information can be purchased from the Georgia Archives.

Within the atlases are historical maps, illustrations, and histories many of which contain family names ideal for genealogical research, while Others are rare antique maps dating back to the early exploration of the state.

Map of Georgia state designed in illustration with the counties and the county seats

Map of Georgia state designed in illustration with the counties and the county seats

Solving Research Problems with a Georgia Maps – If you have started your family research, you might have experienced trouble with trying to identify Georgia city borders and names that have changed over the course of time. This can make it difficult to understand where your ancestors’ information is kept.

Any Historical Georgia Map can indicate who owned specific property in the state and which towns held the county seat at the time. This information is a valuable starting point for your research pointing you to the right location of records.

Because Georgia historic maps were usually commissioned by the county seat, they often display information about the county, including town names. Reading a Georgia map from the time period you are researching can help tremendously in solving these problems by leading you to the correct town records. It can also give you other leads, such as the location of city directories or old post offices in Georgia.

Choosing the Best Georgia Map – If you have a large source of maps to choose from, try starting with the area where your ancestors resided and looking for the maps with the most detail. You can determine a lot by seeing if the area was still rural or more developed, and how far it was to the nearest city. This can shed light on your family’s lifestyle and occupation. Were they farmers who lived in the country, or merchants who traveled often to a nearby city? A map can give you an idea of what occupations were possible.

Map of Georgia County Formations 1758-1932

This Interactive Map of Georgia Counties show the historical boundaries, names, organization, and attachments of every county, extinct county and unsuccessful county proposal from the creation of Georgia in 1758-1932.

Georgia contains 159 counties. Georgia originally consisted of 12 parishes at the time of the American Revolution. These parishes were St. George, St. Thomas, St. Mary, St. Philip, Christ Church, St. Matthew, St. Philip, St. David, St. Patrick, St. John, St. Andrew, St. James and St. Paul.

In 1777 the first Georgia counties were formed. They were Burke, Camden, Chatham, Effingham, Glynn, Liberty, Richmond and Wilkes Counties. The last county to be formed was Peach County in 1924.

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Georgia County Formation Years

Georgia Map Abbreviations

  1. unorg. = unorganized
  2. g. = gained
  3. w. = with
  4. fr. = from
  5. atmt. = attachment
  6. exch = exchanged
  7. nca.= non county area
  8. ch. = changed
  9. Ap – Appling
  10. At – Atkinson
  11. Bac – Bacon
  12. Bak – Baker
  13. Bal – Baldwin
  14. Ban – Banks
  15. Ber – Berrien
  16. BH – Ben Hill
  17. Bib – Bibb
  18. Bl – Bleckley
  19. Bra – Brantley
  20. Bro – Brooks
  21. Brw – Barrow
  22. Bry – Bryan
  23. Btw – Bartow
  24. Bul – Bulloch
  25. Bur – Burke
  26. But – Butts
  27. Cal – Calhoun
  28. Can – Candler
  29. Car – Carroll
  30. Cat – Catoosa
  31. Cbl – Campbell
  32. Cdn – Camden
  33. Chn – Charlton
  34. Clb – Columbia
  35. Cli – Clinch
  36. Clk – Clarke
  37. Cly – Clay
  38. Cob – Cobb
  39. Cof – Coffee
  40. Coo – Cook
  41. Cow – Coweta
  42. Cqt – Colquitt
  1. Cra – Crawford
  2. Cri – Crisp
  3. Crk – Cherokee
  4. Cte – Chattahoochee
  5. Ctg – Chattooga
  6. Ctm – Chatham
  7. Ctn – Clayton
  8. Dad – Dade
  9. Daw – Dawson
  10. Dec – Decatur
  11. Dgs – Douglas
  12. DK – De Kalb
  13. Dod – Dodge
  14. Doo – Dooly
  15. Dty – Dougherty
  16. Ea – Early
  17. Ec – Echols
  18. Ef – Effingham
  19. El – Elbert
  20. Em – Emanuel
  21. Ev – Evans
  22. Fan – Fannin
  23. Fay – Fayette
  24. Fl – Floyd
  25. Fo – Forsyth
  26. Fr – Franklin
  27. Fu – Fulton
  28. Gi – Gilmer
  29. Gla – Glascock
  30. Gly – Glynn
  31. Go – Gordon
  32. Gra – Grady
  33. Gre – Greene
  34. Gw – Gwinnett
  35. Hab – Habersham
  36. Hal – Hall
  37. Han – Hancock
  38. Hea – Heard
  39. Hen – Henry
  40. Ho – Houston
  41. Hrs – Harris
  42. Hrt – Hart
  1. Hsn – Haralson
  2. Ir – Irwin
  3. Jac – Jackson
  4. Jas – Jasper
  5. JD – Jeff Davis
  6. Jfn – Jefferson
  7. Jkn – Jenkins
  8. Joh – Johnson
  9. Jon – Jones
  10. Lam – Lamar
  11. Lan – Lanier
  12. Lau – Laurens
  13. Lee – Lee
  14. Lib – Liberty
  15. Lin – Lincoln
  16. Lon – Long
  17. Low – Lowndes
  18. Lu – Lumpkin
  19. Mac – Macon
  20. Mad – Madison
  21. Mar – Marion
  22. McD – McDuffie
  23. McI – McIntosh
  24. Me – Meriwether
  25. Mit – Mitchell
  26. Mlr – Miller
  27. Mor – Morgan
  28. Mro – Monroe
  29. Mtn – Milton
  30. Mty – Montgomery
  31. Mur – Murray
  32. Mus – Muscogee
  33. Ne – Newton
  34. Oc – Oconee
  35. Og – Oglethorpe
  36. Pa – Paulding
  37. Pe – Peach
  38. Pic – Pickens
  39. Pie – Pierce
  40. Pik – Pike
  41. Po – Polk
  42. Pul – Pulaski
  1. Put – Putnam
  2. Qu – Quitman
  3. Rab – Rabun
  4. Ran – Randolph
  5. Ri – Richmond
  6. Ro – Rockdale
  7. Scr – Screven
  8. Se – Seminole
  9. Sp – Spalding
  10. Spn – Stephens
  11. Su – Sumter
  12. Swt – Stewart
  13. Tat – Tattnall
  14. Tay – Taylor
  15. Tbt – Talbot
  16. Tel – Telfair
  17. Ter – Terrell
  18. Tfo Taliaferro
  19. Th – Thomas
  20. Ti – Tift
  21. Too – Toombs
  22. Tow – Towns
  23. Tre – Treutlen
  24. Tro – Troup
  25. Tu – Turner
  26. Tw – Twiggs
  27. Un – Union
  28. Up – Upson
  29. Was – Washington
  30. Way – Wayne
  31. Wcx – Wilcox
  32. We – Webster
  33. Wfd – Whitfield
  34. Whe – Wheeler
  35. Wkr – Walker
  36. Wks – Wilkes
  37. Wo – Worth
  38. Wre – Ware
  39. Wrn – Warren
  40. Wsn – Wilkinson
  41. Wte – White
  42. Wtn – Walton

Georgia County Map of Road and Highway’s

The Georgia D.O.T. Highway Department has prepared a series of 2016 county road maps. These maps contain more detailed information about man-made features than the geological survey maps. In addition to roads and boundaries, these maps include rural communities, churches, and cemeteries.

These maps are downloadable and are in PDF format. The main use of these are the locations of all known cemeteries in a county and of course the various roads and church locations. These Maps are Free to Download

Old Historical Atlas Maps of Georgia

This Historical Georgia Map Collection are from original copies so you can see Georgia as our ancestors saw them over a hundred years ago.

Some Georgia map years (not all) have cities, railroads, P.O. locations, township outlines and other features useful to the Georgia researcher.

External Georgia Map Links

  • 1778 Eastern part of Florida, of Georgia, and South Carolina – – This map shows the east coast from Cape Fear to Saint Augustine, giving excellent detail mostly along the coast, but as far inland as Augusta. Detail includes rivers, roads, towns, forts and Indian settlements. This is one of the best and most detailed maps of the southeastern coast at the time of the Revolution, a region which was the focus of much of the late action in the war
  • 1795 Map of Georgia state to MS River – one of a small handful produced within the United States prior to 1800. Appeared within the first edition of the first gazetteer of the U.S. Longitude given with Philadelphia as prime meridian. Georgia extends from the Atlantic Ocean across to the Mississippi river. New Orleans seen within West Florida. Tenassee (sic) named above beside Georgia. Mis-named swamp in northern Florida.